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Chick-News.com Poultry Industry News, Comments and more by Simon M. Shane

New SNP Chip Developed for ISA Will Accelerate the Selection Program

09/13/2013
Sep 13, 2013

     

A new SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) detection chip, developed by Hendrix Genetics Research and Technology Centre, will enable ISA to respond more quickly to demands from the Industry and to make their genetic selection procedures both faster and more efficient.


Accelerating Selection

Earlier this year Hendrix Genetics introduced a new Medium Density Chip with 60,000 SNP markers to replace the previous version. The latest SNP Chip was custom made for ISA and will be proprietary to the Company. The main advantage of this chip is that it is more suited to the specific genetic make-up of ISA chickens.

All chickens in the ISA genomic selection program will now be genotyped using this new chip, which will significantly improve the depth and precision in understanding the chicken genome. The new chip is considerably more sensitive in identifying genetic variations within a flock. This will facilitate selection of birds that express the specific traits required by the egg industry. The new technology goes beyond conventional production traits including egg numbers, egg size, feed conversion ratio and daily gain.

ISA can now select for issues such as flock interaction and behavior, skeletal integrity and locomotory function, keel bone strength and susceptibility to specific diseases among other traits. The new chip can be compared to an update of a satellite navigation system. New points of interest have been added, which increases the available amount of genomic information. Geneticists will be able to assess a greater quantity of data and to obtain more accurate information required to select the next generation of world-class hens.


 
Copyright © 2021 Simon M. Shane